Imagine: It’s an ordinary weekday, and in the middle of your daily tasks, you stumble into Clerigos y Tima moment of prayer.  The street corner, the coffee shop, or some other ordinary place is suddenly a place where God has come to meet you.  The church has come out from behind the comfortable pews and doors to be in the places where the rubber meets the road.  It’s Ash Wednesday, and you’re invited to wear your ashes, to claim repentance, grace and deep relationship with God for the challenges of your daily life.

StASFCA  Were you surprised by Ashes to Go? Did you offer ashes in the midst of daily life? Share your stories or pictures on the site, or on our Facebook page.  The Stories page is updated throughout the year as people share reflections and news.

WorcesterMA2013“Ashes to Go” is about bringing spirit, belief, and belonging out from behind church doors, and into the places where we go every day.  It’s a simple event with deep meaning, drawing on centuries of tradition and worship to provide a contemporary moment of grace.

On this site:


9 thoughts on “Home

  1. I wish we had this here n Charlotte courthouse Va or nearby FarmVille Va…where I’m a member of St Theresa’s Roman Catholic Church ….I grew N NJ where u rec’v Ashes B4 work or school…lunch time drop by or mass and last but not least after work or those whom cldn’t make it during the day…..here at our church it’s at 7:00pm only this year w/no drop (heck the day is over by this time)….I’m pretty upset and all the other places are so very far from my home I can’t get to it…very disappointed w/this!

  2. I see this as a positive way to reorient folks back to an emotional connection with transcendence and, perhaps, spur them on to recognize the Lenten season…perhaps encourage one to return to church, or even to come to faith in the one true God; however, the down side just might be that “ashes to go” promotes a sense of ‘individualized’ or ‘consumerized’ faith as in “I don’t have to join a church to be part of God’s community,” and lead to the danger of what Smith & Denton (Soul Searching: The Religious & Spiritual Lives of American Teens, Oxford Press, 2009) call MTD (Moral, Therapeutic, Deism) as a primary reason young people walk away from faith?

  3. I support your right to practice what ever religion you wish. That said, I prefer you do it behind closed doors. I hate the idea of this in your face proselytizing. You are ambushing people. I find this to be very disrespectful of people with a different view point.

    • Then don’t walk over and get ashes silly. lol! You let big business advertise their crap to you all day, but *this* is offensive???

      • I don’t see this as an ambush. That would imply that they were jumping out and putting ashes on your forehead without asking. The same “ambush” theory could be said about advertising as Lynne pointed out, and also any holiday for that matter – do the Christmas trees ambush you? Do Jack-O-Lanterns ambush you as well? We are ambushed by things on a daily basis – sounds, images, etc. I think people who get offended at displays of religious practices are actually threatened for some reason. I wish you God’s blessings and peace in your heart.

    • Incrediably ignorant comment. I’ve seen Ashes to Go for years in NYC at the WTC and never do they ‘ambush’ anyone. They keep their fingers in the goblet where the ashes are kept, you have to walk up to them and ask for the ashes. They do NOT ambush anyone.

  4. We look forward to it (if we can get out of our driveway.) We have a reservation on the noon ferry so the distribution of ashes at the ferry landing will really help us today.

  5. While I respect the effort and support the concept, I sadly chose not to receive ashes at the ferry on Wednesday. Through no fault of the clergy, there was too much giddy, self-conscious laughter in and about the scene. The imposition of ashes is a holy, somber reminder, not a public comedy skit.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *